What we’re reading: Southwest to bid for Frontier, fume events on planes, stay in New Jersey

by Stephanus Surjaputra on July 31, 2009

Southwest to bid For Frontier Airlines

Southwest Airlines is about to bid for Frontier Airlines. It plans to bid $113.6 million according to both airlines. (See related interview.)

The bid from Dallas-based Southwest exceeds the $108.75 million bid from Republic Airways.

Carlo Bertolini, a spokesman for Republic, said his company would study Southwest’s bid before offering a response.

In a release today, Frontier said its agreement with Republic provides for an “auction period”, during which Frontier can seek higher or better bids.

Up in the air: new worries about ‘fume events’ on planes

Can the air you breathe in an airplane be toxic?

Air travelers breathe a combination of recycled cabin air and outside fresh air that has been compressed by the aircraft’s engines—known as “bleed air.” But when the system malfunctions, chemical contaminants can occasionally end up circulating through the airplane, creating a so-called fume event.

[U]nions representing pilots and flight attendants say the chemicals entering the aircraft cabin can endanger the health of flight crews and passengers.

Can’t afford a nice hotel in New York? Stay in New Jersey.

If you have a yearning to visit New York City but can’t afford to stay at the hotels, look across the river.

In particular, The Westin Jersey City Newport is a good bet — it’s luxurious, it has two restaurants and a bar, and best of all? It’s just ten minutes from midtown Manhattan. It’s one of those things few people think about when they’re booking a trip to New York: You don’t have to stay in New York to visit.

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  • Frank

    Can the air you breathe in an airplane be toxic?
    Air travelers breathe a combination of recycled cabin air and outside fresh air that has been compressed by the aircraft’s engines—known as “bleed air.” But when the system malfunctions, chemical contaminants can occasionally end up circulating through the airplane, creating a so-called fume event.
    ====================================================

    At the end of the winter season, when you land and taxi to the gate, the plane will sometimes ingest the salt/deicing fluid that was used on the ramp. You can visually see it coming from the AIR VENTS. It looks like smoke.
    ———————————————————————————————————
    ———————————————————————————————————

    Southwest to bid For Frontier Airlines

    Southwest Airlines is about to bid for Frontier Airlines. It plans to bid $113.6 million according to both airlines. (See related interview.)
    =====================================================

    Southwest Master Plan:

    Plan A: Put Frontier out of business
    Plan B: Put Frontier out of business by purchasing it.

  • Lyngengr

    I believe Frank is correct about SWA’s bid for Frontier. There is no good reason for SWA to take over Frontier. Let me list a few obvious reasons:

    1. Frontier flys Airbus planes, SWA is exclusively a Boeing customer (of 737s).

    2. Frontier is entirely a hub and spoke route system, running everyone through Denver. SWA uses more of a point-to-point system.

    3. Frontier flies to Mexico, which SWA has consistently avoided.

    The real reason for SWA’s offer for Frontier is to prevent Republic, a much smaller airline and potential competitor, from acquiring the larger marker share that would come with the takeover. SWA isn’t really interested in Frontier, they just want to shut it down, sell the assets, and keep Republic from competing with them. SWA has lost more money in fuel hedging this year than they’re offering for Frontier, so even at $114 million, it’s a bargain.

  • jlawrence01

    On the rare occasions that Southwest makes acquisitiions, it is generally to gain a competitive presence at various airports.

    They did not NEED to purchase Morris Air Service in the ’90s BUT it was great to acquire a lot of gates at SLC breaking the Delta monopoly. (Compare fares at SLC and CVG.)

    As for “losing money on fuel hedge contracts”, most companies would prefer losing money on commodity hedge contracts. If they are losing money on the hedges, it generally meals that the spot prices on the underlying commodity are lower than expected. Commodity contracts are purchased to lock in a fuel price to stabilize costs.

  • Frank

    ENGINE OIL:

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=6996&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0

    Gulf War illness researchers UK’s Malcom Hooper (Professor of medicinal chemistry at the UK’s Sunderland University) and US’s Researcher Professor Mohamed Abou-Donia (a specialist in neurotoxicity from Duke University in North Carolina) along with University of Washington professor Clement Furlong have been making headway on identifying biomarkers that will be important for Aircrew members and suspectible passengers on commerical airliners. In addition the military aircrews and passengers they fly might also keep up with this landmark scientific work.

    The scientific work is identifying blood markers in the blood of air crew and passengers that would link neurological degeneration to exposure to cabin air that has been contaminated by neurotoxic organophosphates from engine oil

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