Transportation Security Administration

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) knows that the careful screening of passengers at airport checkpoint is bit of overkill. They know that if a terrorist makes it to the airport and as far as the TSA checkpoint with a bomb, more than a score of security systems have been bypassed. When they randomly shift passengers into the Pre-Check program, they are admitting the obvious.

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Three questions to ponder — Is autopilot bad for pilot proficiency? Should we get rid of TSA? Can dogs in airports relieve stress?

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After a Government Accountability Office study shows that behavior detection is a fraud, the TSA Administrator, John Pistole, defends the program.

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Recent revelations of the National Security Agency’s sweeping domestic surveillance programs may have angered many Americans, but for most travelers, it was nothing new.

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TSA has postponed its changes to its prohibited items list which would have permitted pocket knives, golf clubs, hockey sticks, lacrosse sticks and other items to be taken into airplane cabins by passengers. Ned Levi discusses the rule changes and suggests TSA needs to follow a commonsense approach and drop the changes all together.

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It’s been almost five years since the Transportation Security Administration quietly began installing its so-called Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) — better known as full-body scanners — at airports nationwide. And now the government wants to know what you think of the machines.

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Next time you fly, take a minute to look around at the airport screening area. You’ll see all kinds of interesting passengers, from the “get-alongs” to the dissidents to the folks who think the rules don’t apply to them.

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This month, the TSA announced that starting April 25, it will allow passengers to bring small knives with non-locking blades shorter than 2.36 inches and less than half an inch in width, small novelty bats, ski poles, hockey and lacrosse sticks, billiard cues and up to two golf clubs onto a plane. Has an agency focused on security lost its mind?

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TSA took decisive action in paring its forbidden items list a bit — a tiny bit. Passengers can now carry on small knives and some sporting equipment that after years of careful research and untold hours of committee deliberations have been determined to be non-threatening in terms of airline security.

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Travel as we know it will not turn into an ordeal today. From the speeches that the Secretary of Transportation and the The Secretary of Homeland Security have recently given, combined with rhetoric coming from the administration, the public should be forgiven if they thought the world as we know it was ending.

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