reasonable suspicion

Judge Edward Korman dismissed the ACLU suit, Abidor v. Napolitano, allowing the US Customs and Border Protection program of random border searches and seizures of electronic devices to continue with no requirement of warrants, probable cause, or reasonable suspicion. Ned Levi discusses the CPB program, court rulings which have affected it, and advice for international travelers entering the US.

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The FBI, Homeland Security, and law enforcement agencies throughout the US are documenting the activities of citizens and visitors in a national database of suspicious behavior, which they deem could be the precursor of criminal or terrorism activities. Ned Levi has examined the NSI program, and found that far too often, the actions of the general public and travelers documented in the database, wouldn’t be considered suspicious at all, by a reasonable person.

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The Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit, has made a new ruling concerning searches and seizures of passenger belongings at the border of the US, stating that CBP agents need to recognize there is an expectation of privacy and can’t do a search without a reason. Ned Levi discusses the new ruling and what its effect might be for international travelers.

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Since 9/11, US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has had a program of random inspection of electronic media at the border. Without reasonable suspicion or probable cause, CBP has confiscated laptops and other electronic devices for weeks or even years. Ned Levi brings you up to date on the latest news about this serious problem for international travelers.

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Arizona has enacted a new immigration law, widely considered to be the toughest in the nation. Ned Levi examines the new law, and considers the comments of its supporters and critics in determining its effect on travelers going to or through Arizona.

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Ned discusses the latest news about the Customs and Border Patrol’s program to randomly search and seize laptops, digital cameras, cellphones and other electronic devices at the border, without warrants, reasonable suspicion or probable cause, and what travelers can do to protect their privacy and security.

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You’ve probably heard about the Travelers’ Privacy Protection Act of 2008, a proposed new law that would prevent customs agents from confiscating your laptop computer at the border. But what does the law actually say? Ned Levi takes a look at the law and makes some troubling discoveries.

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