IATA

Today two organizations that most consumers barely know, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) and Open Allies for Airfare Transparency, are sitting down in Miami to discuss the future of travel distribution. In consumer-speak, they are discussing setting new technical standards that will ultimately determine how travelers will be able to purchase airline tickets, extra fees, hotels, rental cars, cruises and packaged tours.

{ 0 comments }

American fined $60,000 for lying to consumers about fees, Asiana captain worried about visual landing, airlines expect hike in demand by 2017

{ 0 comments }

Sue Marcus was looking for a flight from Washington to Tulsa. Instead, she found trouble. Airlines are fighting with their distribution system, hiding fee data and it doesn’t bode well for passengers.

{ 4 comments }

When I heard Thenardier, the pub owner in Les Miserables, sing Master of the House, I couldn’t help thinking that he was an airline executive skiing about fleecing his passengers. Shortly afterwards, a friend sent me a vintage video entitled, “If Airlines Worked Like Health Care.” They both evoke an all-too-real image of today’s airlines.

{ 0 comments }

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) just released a report that concludes that ambiguous or confusing air traffic control (ATC) phraseology “is a frequent contributor to aircraft accidents and incidents.”

{ 2 comments }

In light of the news about needles found in the sandwiches on four Delta Airlines flights last week, Ned Levi examines airline food safety in the US where both TSA and the FDA have watchdog responsibilities to ensure airline food is safe, secure, and fit for consumption.

{ 10 comments }

Miami casino could take away Las Vegas Strip traffic, IATA cuts airline profit forecast, Boeing nears deal with FedEx and SWA

{ 0 comments }

Airport checkpoint of the future, deciding between flying and driving by calculator, what not to do at the airport

{ 1 comment }

Police still looking for Bellagio bandit, new security concept, 787 delivery schedule

{ 0 comments }

The Department of Transportation (DOT) proposed rulemaking (NPRM) has stirred up plenty of controversy. Any time an agency of the government takes up the mantel of consumer protection, business is going to cringe. Ultimately, we know what’s good for customers is normally good for business. But these new proposed regulations are crossing a new line — international borders.

{ 0 comments }