PDA

View Full Version : WTTC urges U.S. to fund national marketing campaign


Ned
10-05-2006, 07:54 AM
Even with trends and forecasts for international travel to the US (49.4M visitors) being positive, the US is the 3rd most visited country in the world, behind France (75.3M visitors) and Spain (55.6M visitors). According to the WTTC the US has lost share of global arrivals, largely as a result of 9/11. The number of international visitors to the US last year was 7% below 2000ís level, yet international travel worldwide increased 17% over the same 5 year period. If the US had kept pace with world growth, it would have had an additional 9M foreign visitors in 2005.

The Travel Industry Association of America (TIA) estimates that the US share of international tourism is at an all-time low, having suffered a double-digit decline since 2000, and a 35% drop since 1992. The cumulative cost of this decline to the national economy over the past 14-15 years is according to TIA, $20B per year. According to TIA, if the US was able to reclaim these losses, every 1% of world market share regained would be worth an estimated 8.1M extra foreign visitors, which would result in an additional $13.4B contribution to GDP and 153,000 more jobs.

TIA points out that the US only has a small tourism office within the Department of Commerce in place of an NTO. And its budget is a mere $5.7M in 2005. They compare that to $75.0M for Spain, $44.3M for France and $79.9M for Australia.

Hence TIA's and WTTC's suggestion for a US tourism promotional budget of $200 million.

Assuming the WTTC and TIA numbers are correct, and as long as the US Tourism Office spends a $200M promotional budget competently, this expenditure sure makes sense to me.

Originally posted by Travel Weekly by Michael Milligan - October 4 2006
WTTC urges U.S. to fund national marketing campaign

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. has annually lost approximately $20 billion over the past 15 years due to its declining status as a top visitor destination, according to a report released by the World Travel & Tourism Council.

The report, Manifesto for the US Travel & Tourism Industry (http://www.wttc.org/publications/pdf/US%20Manifesto.pdf), summarizes the results of the WTTC conference, which was held last April in Washington. At least 700 travel and tourism executives from around the world attended the conference, which was convened for the first time in the U.S.

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, Homeland Security secretary Michael Chertoff, and Karen Hughes, the State Dept.'s under secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, were among the attendees...

...Quoting figures compiled by the TIA, the WTTC noted that the U.S. need only boost its share of world travelers by just 1% to add $13.4 billion to its gross domestic product and generate 153,000 more jobs.

To achieve that, the U.S. would need to create a sustainable inbound marketing campaign.

As part of the effort to develop an effective marketing campaign, the WTTC report recommended that: The economic and social importance of travel and tourism needs to be recognized within the government, at the most-senior levels.
The U.S. Dept. of Commerce-operated Travel & Tourism Advisory Board should be provided with the resources and co-operation from the federal government to take necessary actions.
Federal and state government officials and the private sector should meet at a nationwide conference to develop a three-year agenda geared towards the U.S. regaining its status as the most important travel and tourism destination in the world.
Federal and state government officials and the private sector should meet at a nationwide conference to develop a three-year agenda geared towards the U.S. regaining its status as the most important travel and tourism destination in the world.
The U.S. government must finalize plans to introduce new security measures based on biometric technology.
A national marketing strategy with a promotional budget of at least $200 million should be implemented.
Go to WTTC urges U.S. to fund national marketing campaign (http://www.travelweekly.com/articles.aspx?articleid=53321) to read the entire article.

[Travel Weekly requires free registration to read their entire articles.]