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Ned
08-31-2006, 06:27 PM
With the international situation as it is these days, and considering the climate and beauty of the 50th state, I'm not surprised at all, with this incredible increase of travel to Hawaii, especially by US citizens.

Originally posted by TravelMole.com by David Wilkening - August 31 2006
Cruises and overall tourism on record-setting course in Hawaii


The number of cruise ship passengers is up 50% and the tourism industry in general in Hawaii is on a steady course to have another record year.

"We are very pleased with July's extraordinary performance from the domestic market," said Marsha Wienert, the state tourism liaison.

Domestic arrivals in July reached more than 564,000 visitors for the fourth straight month of growth.

Kauai is getting the greatest gains in tourism with a 13.3% increase for July, the latest month for available figures.

There's also a greater number of visitors coming for meetings and as business travelers.

Hawaii's status as a hot tourism spot is relatively recent development. Before it became a state, Hawaii's economy was tied to military bases such as Pearl Harbor. Inaccessibility and high transportation costs made it isolated.

But in 1959, it became a state and jet travel began to get popular.

As recently as 1962, however, only a million visitors reached Waikiki. But soon after tourism replaced the military as the island's leading industry.

US visitors today are the biggest market for Hawaii, representing more than 92% of total domestic arrivals. Their numbers were also up by 2.4% from the same period last year.

Last year, a record 7.46 million visitors came to Hawaii, spending $11.5 billion. This year, more visitors and higher spending is expected.

"We will set another record," predicted Leroy Laney, a Hawaii Pacific University professor.

Hawaii has 33 cruise ships including three US flagged ships that are home ported here: the Price of Aloha, the Pride of Hawaii and the Pride of America.

Repeat business has helped promote the healthy tourism market. More than half of the recent arrivals here are returning to Hawaii...Go to Cruises and overall tourism on record-setting course in Hawaii (http://www.travelmole.com/stories/110524.php?mpnlog=1) to read the entire article.

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bodega
08-31-2006, 07:30 PM
I do not anything about Travel Mole, and while the article paints a rosy picture on tourism to the island, when I was there in May, tourism was down approx. 4% from 2005. The lack of visitors was extremely noticable in Waikiki. We also commented on the the lack of tourists in Lahaina, too. According to the article numbers have been up for the past 4 months, which goes against the headlines in the Hawaiian newspapers when we were there 3 months ago <_<

susanliber
08-31-2006, 08:16 PM
We are doing a cruise to Hawaii from San Diego....my travel agent said we need our passports for the trip!!! Which do they consider the foreign country - hawaii or the ship?? LOL

:unsure:

Ned
08-31-2006, 08:36 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(susanliber @ Aug 31 2006, 09:16 PM) 36143</div>
We are doing a cruise to Hawaii from San Diego....my travel agent said we need our passports for the trip!!! Which do they consider the foreign country - hawaii or the ship?? LOL

:unsure:
[/b]
Are you sure there's not a non-Hawaiian island on the itinerary, or a stop in Mexico? Many of the cruise lines go to Ensenada Mexico on their way to Hawaii or returning to San Diego. I know Celebrity and Princess both, go to Ensenada on virtually all their US West Coast, Hawaii cruises. In fact, unless you're traveling on a US flagged ship it has to stop in a "nearby" foreign port to make that trip due to the Passenger Services Act if you're going from San Diego to Hawaii.

Ned
08-31-2006, 08:58 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(bodega @ Aug 31 2006, 08:30 PM) 36142</div>
I do not anything about Travel Mole, and while the article paints a rosy picture on tourism to the island, when I was there in May, tourism was down approx. 4% from 2005. The lack of visitors was extremely noticable in Waikiki. We also commented on the the lack of tourists in Lahaina, too. According to the article numbers have been up for the past 4 months, which goes against the headlines in the Hawaiian newspapers when we were there 3 months ago <_<
[/b]
Hi B,

Travel Mole has been pretty reliable for a trade paper in the past. After reading your post I decided to go to the Hawaiian Government's web site. In the Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism site (http://www.hawaii.gov/dbedt) they have made public their up to the moment tourism statistics.

According to what I've read, statewide, tourism is up from April through July compared to last year, at least on people arriving by plane: April - up 12%, May - up 1.7%, June - up 8%, and July - up 3.3%.

During the same period for Cruise ships in 2005 they had 70,021 passengers in Hawaii, and in 2006 they had 97,979, an increase of 40%. For the entire year so far they're up over 50% according to Hawaii DBEDT figures.

So it looks like Travel Mole is correct.

bodega
08-31-2006, 10:33 PM
Yes, you do need a passport for that cruise. You will be in international waters and I do not believe you are going to Fanning Island or are you? That use to be a required stop under the Jones Act since you were leaving one US port on a foreign flag ship heading to another US port and it was the closest nonUS port.

Ned, they may have had an increase in overall number, but the headlines in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin clearly stated a decrease in April/May. My parents live there for part of the year, and it was a topic of interest for serveral days, so I trust that over Travel Mole for that particular period. I heard, but haven't seen it in print, that Japanese tourism was still down this year from wher e they would like it to be, yet dong better than the past few years. The luster had been gone from Golden Week, but it is coming back.

Airfare has been so high for the past few years to Hawaii, that the decrease in tourism in April/May didn't surprise me. We lost many flights from the west coast to Hawaii last year, which had to affect numbers for awhile. Many of these flights were from a low cost charter company. Things have picked up and United has added some flights from SFO to the islands. I am headed back next May and bringing 100 others, so we will be helping with those numbers!!

Ned
08-31-2006, 10:49 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(bodega @ Aug 31 2006, 11:33 PM) 36150</div>
..Ned, they may have had an increase in overall number, but the headlines in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin clearly stated a decrease in April/May. My parents live there for part of the year, and it was a topic of interest for serveral days, so I trust that over Travel Mole for that particular period. I heard, but haven't seen it in print, that Japanese tourism was still down this year from wher e they would like it to be, yet dong better than the past few years. The luster had been gone from Golden Week, but it is coming back
[/b]
The numbers at Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism site would confirm that tourism from Japan to Hawaii is down substantially, but offset by tourism from the US mainland.

wrp96
09-01-2006, 01:05 AM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(susanliber @ Aug 31 2006, 08:16 PM) 36143</div>
We are doing a cruise to Hawaii from San Diego....my travel agent said we need our passports for the trip!!! Which do they consider the foreign country - hawaii or the ship?? LOL

:unsure:
[/b]

The round trip cruises from San Diego to Hawaii make a stop in Ensenada Mexico. If your cruise is a one way from Hawaii to San Diego (or vice versa) your cruise will actually end in Ensenada, not in San Diego. So yes you will need a passport for your cruise.

AaronK
09-01-2006, 04:17 AM
I believe there is a rule somewhere that says that if a ship is going to be doing all US stops, then the ship must be registered in the US and therefore follow all appropriate rules. That is why there are only a handful of Hawaii based vessels. In order to get around the requirement, they must stop somewhere internationally, either Mexico or another island, hence you will be going to another country.

Ned
09-01-2006, 06:47 AM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(AaronK @ Sep 1 2006, 05:17 AM) 36156</div>
I believe there is a rule somewhere that says that if a ship is going to be doing all US stops, then the ship must be registered in the US and therefore follow all appropriate rules. That is why there are only a handful of Hawaii based vessels. In order to get around the requirement, they must stop somewhere internationally, either Mexico or another island, hence you will be going to another country.
[/b]
Hi Aaron,

The rule in question is the Passenger Services Act (PSA) which I believe was enacted in 1892. In 1920, Senator Wesley L. Jones sponsored a Merchant Marine Act amendment to the PSA relating to the shipping of merchandise, not passengers. Ever since, the PSA, because of the Merchant Marine admendments, has incorrectly been tagged as the Jones Act.

Simply put the PSA basically states, "foreign" ships may not carry passengers (whether Americans or others) between US ports, subject to certain exceptions. In fact it precisely states, "No foreign vessels shall transport passengers between ports or places in the United States, either directly or by way of a foreign port, under a penalty of $300 for each passenger so transported and landed." Think about how steep that fine actually is. A 2,400 passenger ship would be fined $720,000 on each illegal cruise. That's not "chicken feed." There are a series of exceptions to that rule in the PSA.

By the way to be an "American-flagged" ship, the ship must be primarily fabricated in the US, totally assembled in the US, have an American crew and be registered in the US.

To understand the exceptions to the PSA you have to understand how the law defines ports. Non-US ports are classified as either "nearby foreign ports" or "distant foreign ports." A "nearby foreign port" is defined as any port in Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, or any port in the Caribbean (except those in the Netherlands Antilles, such as Aruba and Curaçao). "Distant foreign port" is defined as any other port, except a U.S. port.

The exception which is important to the cruise lines going from the US West Coast to Hawaii or back is "A cruise between different US ports where no permanent disembarkation is permitted along the way, but at least one port is a nearby foreign port" is permitted.

So that means if you leave from San Diego and go to Ensenada, Mexico, but don't allow any passengers to permanently leave the ship in Ensenada you can then go to Hawaii where the cruise may end.

I hope my explanation has been clear.

AaronK
09-01-2006, 07:01 AM
Thanks Ned.

I knew there was a rule, but thats about it. I'm a computer geek, not a travel agent :)

Ned
09-01-2006, 07:20 AM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(AaronK @ Sep 1 2006, 08:01 AM) 36160</div>
Thanks Ned.

I knew there was a rule, but thats about it. I'm a computer geek, not a travel agent :)
[/b]
I'm a computer geek too, but in traveling for the last 50 years (I was lucky that my parents could and did take my brother and I all over the our country, Europe and the Middle East, starting when we were very young. My wife and I continued that for ourselves and our kids.) some things have rubbed off into my head. But mostly, I'm a fanatic about researching all of our trips in order to plan them (even though we always use a travel agent for anything but the most straight forward trips such as visiting our kids in LA) and get the most out of them. I think a well informed traveler is a better client for a travel agent.

Have a great day Aaron.

wrp96
09-01-2006, 11:46 AM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Ned @ Sep 1 2006, 06:47 AM) 36158</div>

To understand the exceptions to the PSA you have to understand how the law defines ports. Non-US ports are classified as either "nearby foreign ports" or "distant foreign ports." A "nearby foreign port" is defined as any port in Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, or any port in the Caribbean (except those in the Netherlands Antilles, such as Aruba and Curaçao). "Distant foreign port" is defined as any other port, except a U.S. port.

The exception which is important to the cruise lines going from the US West Coast to Hawaii or back is "A cruise between different US ports where no permanent disembarkation is permitted along the way, but at least one port is a nearby foreign port" is permitted.

So that means if you leave from San Diego and go to Ensenada, Mexico, but don't allow any passengers to permanently leave the ship in Ensenada you can then go to Hawaii where the cruise may end.

[/b]

If the ship starts in one US port and ends in another US port, then the ship must stop in a DISTANT foreign port along the way. It is only on the cruises that start and stop in the same US port that a stop at a nearby foreign port is enough.

So on the roundtrip Hawaii from California cruises, the brief stop in Ensenada, Mexico satisfies the PSA since they only need to stop at a nearby foreign port. The problem comes in on the one way Hawaii to West Coast or one way West Coast to Hawaii cruises. In order to satisfy the PSA they either need to stop in a DISTANT foreign port (the nearest of which on the Pacific side are in Central/South America or Kiribati) or they have to actually start or end the cruise in a foreign country. That is why the one way cruises to Hawaii start (or end) in Ensenada with the passengers bused to and from San Diego.

bodega
09-01-2006, 12:04 PM
They also have stopped at Fanning Island to meet this requirement.

bodega
09-01-2006, 12:34 PM
Ned, I found the article and I was off a month. The figures were for March of 2006, not April. The rain on Kauai, with the dam breaking and the sewage spill in Waikiki, were listed as possible reasons for the low numbers. There was a later article stating that number had increased 10% in April over the same time period in 2005.

I still trust the HCVB over goverment figures, but the good news for the islands, which rely on heavenly on tourism, is that people are visiting. I am sure the sewage spill in Waikiki, kept people from visiting Oahu and that is why we found the streets so empty at night. I do not know what was keeping people from Maui, but we just didn't the amount of tourists on the street in Lahiana as we have seen during the same period in years past.

Since 9/11 the fares have been steadily going up. Passengers feel safer flying to Hawaii than NY or DC, so they are willing to pay more for those tickets.

susanliber
09-01-2006, 06:17 PM
It is a round trip....and I do think there is a stop in Mexico - Ensada? What is the Jones Act? Some one else told me they had to make one stop in a non US port because of the gambling on the ship?

My TA told me about the passports before I knew we were stopping there.....We are only there for a few hours on the way back. We don't even plan to leave the ship.

Kairho
09-01-2006, 06:34 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(susanliber @ Sep 1 2006, 07:17 PM) 36232</div>
What is the Jones Act? Some one else told me they had to make one stop in a non US port because of the gambling on the ship? [/b]
Has nothing to do with gambling. In a nutshell, the Jones Act says that a non-US flagged vessel cannot carry passengers between two US ports. Thus, at least one stop in a non-US port is required. Applies to airlines, too, which is why you don't see foreign carriers doing London-Chicago-Milwaukee routes.

susanliber
09-02-2006, 07:07 AM
Thanks for your answer....that make sense now with some of the itineries that I have seen.

Ned
09-02-2006, 08:04 AM
K., your new avatar is great!

JDMOR
09-04-2006, 12:57 PM
I hate long flights. Since their ships are USA Flagged, does NCL America plan to offer one way trips to and from Hawaii? For years I have been taking major lines Alaskan transition cruises in spring or fall to get from or to Honolulu. They originate or end in Ensenada or Vancouver and then fly fly the other way. We cruise one way, stay in Hawaii a week or so, and fly one way. Makes a great trip enjoying shipboard life as well as enjoying Hawaii on land.

Ned
09-04-2006, 02:01 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(JDMOR @ Sep 4 2006, 01:57 PM) 36306</div>
I hate long flights. Since their ships are USA Flagged, does NCL America plan to offer one way trips to and from Hawaii? For years I have been taking major lines Alaskan transition cruises in spring or fall to get from or to Honolulu. They originate or end in Ensenada or Vancouver and then fly fly the other way. We cruise one way, stay in Hawaii a week or so, and fly one way. Makes a great trip enjoying shipboard life as well as enjoying Hawaii on land.
[/b]
From what I can tell the 3 NCL America ships, Pride of Hawaii, Pride of America, and Pride of Aloha only have cruises which start and end in Hawaii through December 2007.

There other two ships which work in Hawaii, the Norwegian Sun and Norwegian Wind, not US flagged, spend their Hawaiian seasons on longer cruises which start in Hawaii, go to the Fanning Islands, and then end in Hawaii. The Norwegian Sun and Norwegian Wind each have occasional repositioning cruises in which they do have one ways to or from the North American west coast. The Norwegian Wind has one in a couple of weeks, for example.

bodega
09-04-2006, 02:46 PM
I would have clients lined up to take those cruises if they departed from SFO to HNL like the Lurine use to do. Those were full of fanfare and excitement and I would love to see that kind of fun come back into US mainland departures. Departing out of MIA on our first cruise was a BIG diappointment after all the years I went to SF to see family and friends off to Hawaii. There use to be bands on the dock, the streamers that you held on the dock, that was help in the hands of someone on the ship as the ship pulled out, the flowers and food. It was something I am so pleased to have experienced. There is a market for it these cruises, but cost is going to be a factor due to the employment issue for US flag ships.

My parents sailed the USS Lurine HNL and they talk about the officers wearing dark uniforms from the mainland and you knew you were in the tropics when you woke up in the morning to the offices in their white uniforms. With mega ships being a destination, sailing from SF to HNL with no ports in between would appeal to lots of people.

Yes, Ned and those cruise sell out. Passengers love them.

Ned
09-04-2006, 03:21 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(bodega @ Sep 4 2006, 03:46 PM) 36320</div>
Yes, Ned and those cruise sell out. Passengers love them.
[/b]
Of course they would sell out. Look at the number of people who love cruise ships as a destination unto themselves. I'm just not one of them, and of course, that's why cruises lines have so many different kinds of itineraries.

Guys and gals, you have beaten me in submission. :lol: I will acknowlege that there are many many cruisers out there who enjoy being at sea as much, or more, than visiting a port. Just don't expect me to book cruises with you all which have more days at sea than in ports. I'd rather wave a fond bon voyage to you from dockside. :rolleyes:

bodega
09-04-2006, 03:58 PM
That's the beauty of travel, there is usually something for everyone :)

Ned
09-04-2006, 04:36 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(bodega @ Sep 4 2006, 04:58 PM) 36326</div>
That's the beauty of travel, there is usually something for everyone :)
[/b]
I agree. Now, if only I could get a ride on a magic carpet... :D