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GradGirl
06-29-2005, 08:43 AM
Okay, I try and try to control my emotions about being treated like a common criminal just because I want to fly somewhere. I have tried to calm myself down after the male TSA agents wanted to feel my breasts by giving them the benefit of the doubt, "That wasn't harassment, they just are following rules." But every trip through the gauntlet of abuse that is the TSA checkpoint just makes me so angry I can't see straight for 30 minutes after.



Why is it acceptable to treat people this way? To feel our breasts? To stick a wand in between our legs? To force arthritic grandmothers to bend over and unfasten their shoes without so much as a chair to sit in? To tell my husband to unbuckle his pants? To pat down small children, for heaven's sake? This is disturbing and unacceptable to me.



After all, the head of DHS testified to Congress that screeners aren't any better at finding guns and bombs than the pre-9/11 screeners were. There is no purpose to the enhanced scrutiny - it's all theater to make the uninformed believe that they are safer. We are in exactly, precisely, the same boat we were in before, except now we get treated like lying scum in the process.



My answer is simply to avoid flying at all costs. Luckily Amtrak serves most of the cities I want / need to travel to. What else can I do, Terry, with all this righteous indignation at the TSA's abusive and purposeless invasions of my body and my belongings?

terry
06-29-2005, 11:27 AM
GradGirl -



Perhaps Archie Bunker was right when, back in the 70's, he proposed a different (and better?) solution to thwart skyjackers: Instead of trying to disarm potential criminals, arm ALL the passengers, then see who is willing to try any funny business. In the meantime, I’m afraid we flyers will jusr have to endure the treatment from the TSA.



Terry



PS By the way, I’ve rarely had a problem with TSA personnel. I find that most of them are conscientious and try to do their job.

Dorothy
07-18-2005, 01:25 PM
Originally posted by terry@Jun 29 2005, 11:27 AM
GradGirl -
Perhaps Archie Bunker was right when, back in the 70's, he proposed a different (and better?) solution to thwart skyjackers: Instead of trying to disarm potential criminals, arm ALL the passengers, then see who is willing to try any funny business. In the meantime, I’m afraid we flyers will jusr have to endure the treatment from the TSA.
Terry
PS By the way, I’ve rarely had a problem with TSA personnel. I find that most of them are conscientious and try to do their job.
3196

The system within TSA is set up to try to prevent male screening of women and women screening men. I was a TSA Screener. As a female screener I was either yelled at or verbally berated because of the screening 7 out of 10 times by the women I had to screen. The majority of the women travelers were ill mannered, verbally abusive and at times threatening to the female screeners. So I guess if she got a male to screen her I feel sorry for the guy screener. I left TSA because I was appalled and embarrased at the way women treated the workers in the airports. I am not you average thin skinned female. I have served in the military and learned to tough it out in many situations. Men were more patient and accomodating of the requirements.

PerfectJourneys
07-18-2005, 02:10 PM
I do a fair amount of air travel and must submit to a "pat-down" for virtually every flight due to a large metal rod that was inserted in my right calf after my leg was broken. (I say virtually every flight because, for some reason, I never seem to set off the metal detectors at Heathrow!)

I find myself starting to get anxious as soon as I begin my wait in the queue. I remove my shoes, my watch, etc. and walk through knowing that I will hear the big "buzz". I then wait for the "inspection". I explain about my leg, they wave the wand there, hear it go off and will continue with the inspection. Here is where my experiences vary. I have had agents just to a very unintrusive wanding and general mild pat down after confirming the noise is because of my leg AND I have had much more invasive experiences.

At one airport recently (and this is not unusual) I had to stand with my legs apart, arms straight out to the sides while the female agent felt all around my back, under my arms, came to my front and felt independently all around each of my breasts, before continuing down to by abdomen, etc. This was done in full view of every single person walking through the detector and the rest of the people who were waiting for their belongings to come off the belt. There had to be about 15 people watching this event. I really was nearly in tears and feeling very, very humiliated and embarrassed. (Also, this entire time I am trying to keep an eye on my belongings which were some distance away and I was not allowed to touch until AFTER all this!)

Now, I understand that they do need to check. I certainly wouldn't want anyone being able to go on through just by saying they had metal in their body. What I don't understand is why they must do this right there in front of the entire airport. Most of the walk-through detectors now indicate which area of the body has the metal. Once that has been determined by the technology and they have wanded my legs (I always wear a skirt so they can visibly see my leg!), why must the rest of my body be subjected to a public "feel-up".

Just typing this is stressing me out about my trip next week!!! Sorry so long winded, I guess I am hoping that someone can provide me with a valid rationale that I can keep in mind the next time I am being publicly groped. :(

So Clear
07-19-2005, 09:27 AM
To inform the public, TSA has a web site with a list of Permitted and Prohibited Items. How very very nice of them to clearly inform me of what to pack in my carry on.

With the Ultimate CYA Disclaimer:

“The screener may determine that an item not on the prohibited chart is prohibited. In addition, the screener may also determine that an item on the permitted chart is dangerous and therefore may not be brought through the security checkpoint.”

You'all go that clear now? Good. :lol:

susanliber
07-19-2005, 09:40 AM
I nearly always carry a copy with me....I always have my knitting needles with me!! I have never had a probelm bringing them on but on the knitting and crocheting boards, a lot of people have had them taken from them. The Canadian members say they cannot have them at all.