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TPARick
05-10-2010, 06:53 PM
Ned and anyone else who can please answer my question.

Today while I was at Publix grocery store I passed thru the soup section.
I noticed the Lipton Onion soup mix for $1.24.

A couple of isles away I passed the kosher food section and there was a box of Kosher Lipton onion soup mix for $2.79.

Can someone please tell me what is the difference in the packages,are the ingredients different or just the process how the soup mix is made and packaged?

AaronK
05-10-2010, 07:33 PM
I'll take a guess.
I believe most onion soup is made from beef stock. Therefore, I would surmise that onion soup mix is made from prepared stock.
Kosher beef costs more than regular beef, hence the price difference. In addition, any food certified Kosher requires certification, separate cooking facilities, and special supervision.
It wouldn't surprise me if Lipton runs two lines.....

Ned
05-10-2010, 09:22 PM
Rick, while the taste of the two are close to the same, they are not the same. I find the Kosher version less salty.

The ingredients of the two have differences. For example, the Kosher version use partially hydrogenated palm oil and the non-kosher uses partially hydrogenated soybean oil. The non-kosher has yeast in it, the kosher version not. The Kosher version uses corn flour and arabic gum as thickeners, while the non-kosher one uses corn starch. There are many other differences too.

Aaron, apparently neither uses any beef products.

I believe the Kosher version is made and packaged under the supervision of the "Organized Kashrut Laboratories" and their Rabbis. Even if it's another organization, it is supervised by a Rabbi.

The non-kosher version is supervised by Lipton alone and local government food sanitation officials.

The big deal about the Kosher version is it's "parve," meaning it contains no meat or dairy products, so it can be used with any food (milk or meat, milkhik or fleyshik) by Kosher Jews or Muslims. The non-Kosher version is not "parve."

Any other questions Rick?

TPARick
05-11-2010, 07:49 AM
Rick, while the taste of the two are close to the same, they are not the same. I find the Kosher version less salty.

The ingredients of the two have differences. For example, the Kosher version use partially hydrogenated palm oil and the non-kosher uses partially hydrogenated soybean oil. The non-kosher has yeast in it, the kosher version not. The Kosher version uses corn flour and arabic gum as thickeners, while the non-kosher one uses corn starch. There are many other differences too.

Aaron, apparently neither uses any beef products.

I believe the Kosher version is made and packaged under the supervision of the "Organized Kashrut Laboratories" and their Rabbis. Even if it's another organization, it is supervised by a Rabbi.

The non-kosher version is supervised by Lipton alone and local government food sanitation officials.

The big deal about the Kosher version is it's "parve," meaning it contains no meat or dairy products, so it can be used with any food (milk or meat, milkhik or fleyshik) by Kosher Jews or Muslims. The non-Kosher version is not "parve."

Any other questions Rick?

Thanks Ned
Having grown up in Philly and attending school with Jewish students, I was aware of some of the kosher food requirements. I just couldn't figure out why a Kosher box of Lipton soup would be that different to warrant the additional $1.50 charge.

Ned
05-11-2010, 10:10 AM
Rick, please note I didn't say it warranted the extra buck - 50. It's different, and the rabbinic supervision does cost something, but in my opinion, they are merely charging what the "traffic will bear."

Thanks Ned
Having grown up in Philly and attending school with Jewish students, I was aware of some of the kosher food requirements. I just couldn't figure out why a Kosher box of Lipton soup would be that different to warrant the additional $1.50 charge.

abruton
05-11-2010, 02:07 PM
Anything Kosher must be made in a facility overseen by a Rabbi. This is to make sure that all the Kosher (clean) rules are observed.
All prices are usually mitigated by the volume produced.
The more you make of anything, the less each unit will cost.
Kosher is a smaller market, add the special facilities (Rabbi on station) and you have a larger pricing.

Ned
05-11-2010, 02:36 PM
That may be true (about price), and is, for a smaller company, or a company which has only one or two Kosher products, but Lipton is a division of Unilever, which makes countless Kosher certified products. There is no reason for Lipton Kosher soups to cost that much extra over the non-kosher soups.

Sure the US Kosher market is smaller than the non-Kosher market, but even market size doesn't make that much of a difference.

Locally here in PHL, the difference between the two is $0.22 at Superfresh. On Amazon, the difference is $0.63 per box. Publix is gouging. They are charging what they can get away with.

Frankly, I'd buy it somewhere else. I find Publix high for lots of things. When I visit my Dad in Florida, I won't walk in the store.

Where is Piggly Wiggly when you need them.

This is a case of what the traffic will bear, in my personal opinion.

Anything Kosher must be made in a facility overseen by a Rabbi. This is to make sure that all the Kosher (clean) rules are observed.
All prices are usually mitigated by the volume produced.
The more you make of anything, the less each unit will cost.
Kosher is a smaller market, add the special facilities (Rabbi on station) and you have a larger pricing.