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wrp96
09-11-2008, 05:43 PM
Well, a friend of mine took the risk for the lower fares during hurricane season and just got bitten. She returned to Galveston this morning on the Carnival Ecstasy, her flight home was scheduled for tomorrow morning which was cancelled due to Hurricane Ike. Unfortunately she was not able to get a seat on a flight today and is at a hotel on the harbor in Galveston which is currently under a mandatory evacuation order. It is very likely that she is going to be evacuated out of Galveston to a shelter who knows where.

Ned
09-11-2008, 06:32 PM
That's really a shame. Whether you roll the dice or not, that's really getting hit hard.

jjjenny
09-11-2008, 08:43 PM
I just hate hurricane season. Today we had numerous phone calls from people trying to get out of here. We had other calls from people who are scheduled to go on cruises next week and are worried about their flights.
One group had to cancel their cruise today on the Ecstasy because they didn't want to leave their cars in Galveston. Today has been one crazy day!
I hope your friends were able to get out of Galveston. I heard they evacuated about 3,000 people by bus.
Tomorrow curfew starts at 10am here in my area and Galveston will probably have a curfew also.

wrp96
09-11-2008, 08:44 PM
Just found out that she is at a hotel near Houston Hobby.

tdew
09-12-2008, 06:12 AM
Some years ago, while in Galveston, we saw a presentation about the Hurricane in 1900. It's hard to describe the experience, as it combined the story, photos and sounds in a way that made it almost like a movie.
The tragic story was very well presented.

It made it hard to understand the fancy beach houses that have been built in recent years, that are out past the end of the sea wall that was constructed after that devestating storm.

I hope everyone who is told to evacuate, does so and that all are kept safe from this one.

Ned
09-12-2008, 06:47 AM
I've been in 4 hurricanes, each category one. The last time was when the kids were small and we were at the beach on vacation. There was no suggestion or order to evacuate. That last one saw lots of damage, but generally minor. Lots of trees went down, and there was no power for about a day on that last one.

The worst one was when I was a kid; Hurricane Hazel in 1954 (one of the worst hurricanes of the 20th century). It went inland at North Carolina/South Carolina and then went north, over land the whole way, yet was still packing winds gusting to 110 when it reached New York City. When it hit Toronto (can you believe a hurricane hitting Toronto) it was still packing winds of 90mph, and so was still considered a hurricane when it hit there and dropped over 8 inches of rain. We lost power for two days from that storm, but our house had no damage. Lots of trees in our neighborhood went down, however.

The noise from these hurricanes was quite something. If a category three hurricane or worse were bearing down on me, I wouldn't wait for an evacuation order to get out of the way.

tdew
09-12-2008, 07:18 AM
If a category three hurricane or worse were bearing down on me, I wouldn't wait for an evacuation order to get out of the way.

Ned, we have a condo on an island along the Gulf Coast of FL and have been there three different times when hurricanes came along. In each case, we didn't wait until the evacuation order came before heading inland. Luckily we've a place to go to when that happens, as my mother is inland.

My High school class was known as the Hurricane Class because we started school on the day that Hurrican Donna hit New York.

The hardest part of the evacuations is that people leave when one storm threatens and it turns out to be mild or actually goes a different way. Then the next time a storm is coming, they expect it to be the same thing and refuse to leave.
It's human nature, I suppose, just like the school boards trying to plan the calendar for next year's snow days, based on the current year's snowfall...

Caribbean Queen
09-12-2008, 08:40 AM
I lived in Biloxi, MS when Camille came thru there. I was only in kindergarden, but boy do I remember the noise, rain and wind. The damage was very frightening to a 5 year old. If I remember correctly it was a cat 5. We stayed in our home and did not evacuate.

jjjenny
09-12-2008, 08:53 AM
I've been in 3 hurricanes. The first was Opal and we were without electricity for just a little over a week. The 3rd one was Rita and we had quite a bit of damage to our house and were without electricity for 2 weeks. The 3rd week we went to Houma and returned home when our area got electricity.
We are expecting hurricane force winds here, but, I'm not too sure about that. Cameron, which is south of us, is reported to be already under water.
We have a generator, 3 barrels of gas, a Coleman stove, and plenty of food and batteries. We also have a chainsaw which does come in handy after hurricanes.

wrp96
09-12-2008, 09:03 AM
We're still recovering from the affects of Gustav up here - and he wasn't a hurricane by the time he got to us. Unfortunately it appears that Ike wants to visit us after he visits Texas so we may be in for some fun again this weekend.

I keep thinking about my friend's situation. The airlines all have great change policies once hurricanes are threatened but it all depends on seats on flights. Most airlines are still operating flights into and out of Houston until this afternoon, unlike Southwest that shut down theirs at 9am today. If she'd been on any airline other than Southwest, she would've had a better chance of getting out on a flight to anywhere (even if it wasn't home) as they at least still have flights going, instead she's getting to experience Hurricane Ike first hand.

icymrot
09-12-2008, 09:05 AM
I hope everyone who is told to evacuate, does so and that all are kept safe from this one.

I was watching CNN last night for a bit and Campbell Brown was talking to Roland Martin about the situation because he has family in that area. They are not evacuating even though they were told to. He said many people in that area remember what happened before Rita (I think that was the one) when it took 17 hours to get to Dallas (usually a 4hr drive) and the hurricane turned at the last minute. It sounded like many people are making the same choice to stay and ignore the evacuation order because the last storm turned and missed Galveston/Houston.

I have never been in that situation, and can only imagine the stress of fighting traffic and leaving behind everything hoping my house will survive, but when the National Weather Service is using words like "certain death" wouldn't it be time to get up and go? Wasn't Katrina enough evidence of what Mother Nature can throw at us to not risk it just because a storm 3 years ago turned away at the last minute?

tdew
09-12-2008, 09:43 AM
can only imagine the stress of fighting traffic and leaving behind everything hoping my house will survive,

Granted, it has to be hard, but I will never understand what people think they are going to be able to do to protect their houses. Are they going to hold the roof on? Isn't it better to protect the people and worry about the possessions after they've been taken care of?

prismtx
09-12-2008, 10:43 AM
After the disaster evacuation with hurricane Rita 3 years ago, the residents of Houston are being told if they haven't already evacuated, to stay put and ride out Hurricane Ike.

During the Rita evacuation, the roads became clogged and cars ran out of gas. I had several friends that either gave up and went back home or spent over 20 hours fighting traffic to get to Dallas. They had 110 people killed during the evacuation and only 9 killed by Rita. So they are saying if you don't live in a storm surge area, to just stay where you are.

Guess we will know in a couple of days if that was the right choice. Personally, I would have left Wednesday night while the roads were still clear. As of this morning the trip was taking 8-10 hours for many of the evacuation busses.

jjjenny
09-12-2008, 11:40 AM
I just talked to my brother. He lives in League City, a couple of miles from Kemah and not far from Galveston. He is going to stay and yesterday bought a generator. He lives a 1/2 mile from a hotel that is the highest point in Galveston County and is as safe as a bomb shelter. He said if it gets really rough that they will go to the hotel. I didn't tell him what it's like during a hurricane. Once the winds get really high and debris is blowing around and trees are falling, he will not be able to go anywhere.
He has never experienced a hurricane.

Gesualdo
09-12-2008, 02:17 PM
Some years ago, while in Galveston, we saw a presentation about the Hurricane in 1900. It's hard to describe the experience, as it combined the story, photos and sounds in a way that made it almost like a movie.
The tragic story was very well presented.

It made it hard to understand the fancy beach houses that have been built in recent years, that are out past the end of the sea wall that was constructed after that devestating storm.

I hope everyone who is told to evacuate, does so and that all are kept safe from this one.

Well...they're not, from what I hear. Cantore was shaking his head all over the Weather Channel this morning about how many people were still on Galveston this morning - still up on the seawall, in fact. Maybe it's the memory of the Rita evacuation coupled with the memory of Gustav not being the next "Katrina."

A few folks with whom I correspond online are cruising on the Conquest this week. Carnival finally decided just today that they weren't going to be returning for the next sailing on Sunday, and perhaps not Monday either - which would also affect the next Ecstasy sailing as well.

Someone posted a webcam shot of The Strand in Galveston from about 9:00 this morning and it was already flooded.

Nasty business, this Ike. :mad: