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GREGGWELPE
10-02-2007, 04:55 PM
I have my pumpkin patch in full bloom, so does anyone have any good recipes for breads, pies and soups using pumpkins? I also have Butter Nut squash if anyone has some recipes for them too......thanks! :)

Ned
10-02-2007, 05:55 PM
The Old Horn & Hardart's Automat Pumpkin Pie
This is perhaps the most famous pumpkin pie recipe in the Northeastern part of the US.

2 cups cooked pumpkin (by the way, that's the equivalent of a 15oz can)
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 - 14 1/2 ounce can of evaporated milk (This is from the original recipe and from what I can tell, 12 ounce cans are the only larger size available now. When I made the pie for the first time last year, I tried to use 1 - 12 oz can and I did a second with a full 14.5 oz. I liked the full 14.5 oz better, but then I had quite a bit of evaporated milk left and nothing else for it.)
2 large eggs (Medium eggs will not do, especially if you use the full 14.5 oz of evaporated milk.)
3/4 cup sugar
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 - 11" prepared pastry crust

Preheat oven to 425F.

In a large bowl, beat together all the ingredients (except the crust :rolleyes:) with a power beater or hand whisk until the mixture is smooth. Line an 11 inch pie tin with the pastry. Pour in the filling, and bake in the preheated oven for 40 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center of the pie comes out clean.

Serves 8

susanliber
10-02-2007, 08:40 PM
I have a good pumpkin pancake recipe but it is at work....I will post it on Friday when I get home. I am not going in until Thursday this week.

Annette
10-02-2007, 08:49 PM
I highly recommend www.allrecipes.com for searching for recipes. I've gotten some really, really good ones from there. Such as:

Pumpkin Bread (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Pumpkin-Bread-IV/Detail.aspx) (chocolate chips are really nice in this)


Double Layer Pumpkin Cheesecake (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Double-Layer-Pumpkin-Cheesecake-2/Detail.aspx)

Iced Pumpkin Cookies (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Iced-Pumpkin-Cookies/Detail.aspx)

Mom's Pumpkin Pie (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Moms-Pumpkin-Pie/Detail.aspx) (really nice)

I can cut/paste the recipes for anyone who can't get the links to work for some reason.

Linder
10-03-2007, 12:21 PM
This is actually a recipe from Weight Watchers, and it's great.

Pumpkin Fluff with Cool Whip. (2 thingies)

15 oz canned pumpkin
1 cup(s) 2% reduced-fat milk
8 oz Cool Whip Free Whipped Topping
1 pkg. SF Vanilla pudding mix
2 to 3 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

Combine in bowl: Beat with mixer until well blended. Add cool whip and stir together well. Makes 8 Servings

Lynn
10-03-2007, 03:22 PM
Gregg, first read thru this: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Fields/8616/Thanksgiving/freshpumpkin.html

Then make this! http://www.joyofbaking.com/PumpkinCheesecake.html

It's my annual 'pumpkin pie' at Thanksgiving! One of our local farmers told me that if you use canned pumpking that it is actually hubbard squash. Don't know if that is fact or not but wow are they big ugly things!!

ARTraveler
10-04-2007, 04:34 PM
This is actually a recipe from Weight Watchers, and it's great.

Pumpkin Fluff with Cool Whip. (2 thingies)

15 oz canned pumpkin
1 cup(s) 2% reduced-fat milk
8 oz Cool Whip Free Whipped Topping
1 pkg. SF Vanilla pudding mix
2 to 3 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

Combine in bowl: Beat with mixer until well blended. Add cool whip and stir together well. Makes 8 Servings

Two points per serving? about how much is a serving - a cup? More? Less?

Ned
10-04-2007, 05:02 PM
Linder, in looking up Cool Whip Free? one can see it's mostly water and artificial color, and chemicals; corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup, hydrogenated coconut and palm kernel oil (CPKO), sodium caseinate, vanilla extract, xanthan and guar gums, polysorbate 60 (glycosperse), and beta carotene. It does contain no fat, no cholesterol, virtually no sodium <1%, almost no carbohydrate or sugar (1%). My cardiologist who wants me to stay away from high sodium, high cholesterol, high fat foods recommends not eating products like that. He doesn't think they're good for anyone to ingest. Why not substitute a low fat milk based whipped cream instead, such as what you'd get adding gelatin to evaporated skimmed milk to make some. Using 1 teaspoon of unflavored gelatin to 12-ounces of canned evaporated skimmed milk, with a small amount of sugar and vanilla extract to taste makes a great low fat whipped cream.

This is actually a recipe from Weight Watchers, and it's great.

Pumpkin Fluff with Cool Whip. (2 thingies)

15 oz canned pumpkin
1 cup(s) 2% reduced-fat milk
8 oz Cool Whip Free Whipped Topping
1 pkg. SF Vanilla pudding mix
2 to 3 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

Combine in bowl: Beat with mixer until well blended. Add cool whip and stir together well. Makes 8 Servings

susanliber
10-04-2007, 07:06 PM
These are from the most recent issue of the Hannaford Fresh magazine. I made them for the ladies here at work and they liked them.

3 cups just add water pancake mix
1/2 cup wheat germ
1 tsp ground cinnamon - I used more
1/4 tsp nutmeg - we didn't have any here so I used apple pie spice
2 1/2 water
1 cup canned or fresh pumpkin, squash or sweet potato puree

maple syrup or jam for serving.

I thought they would be pretty heavy but they were not. The recipe made about 6 servings - 18 4 inch pancakes. I used a 1/4 measure to put the batter onto the skillet.

Kairho
10-04-2007, 08:04 PM
The recipe made about 6 servings - 18 4 inch pancakes.
Four inch pancakes? Who eats those anymore? Any self-respecting pancake must be at least 6 inches minimum (in which case the recipe makes 4 decent "servings") or 7 inch even better (3 "servings").

And while I'm at it, who made up the ridiculous "servings" measurement? I don't believe I've ever seen an accurate definition of a "serving."

Ned
10-04-2007, 08:23 PM
Maybe they're just large "silver dollar" pancakes?

As far as serving size...here's the FDA definition:
Serving size a standardized amount of a food, such as a cup or an ounce, used in comparing similar foods. Serving sizes are stated on the food label. Serving size on the food label is listed as a common household measure followed by the equivalent metric quantity in parenthesis, for example, "1/2 cup (112 g)."

After reading that I think one has to agree with you that the term is absurd as the amount varies according to whoever is specifying it.

Four inch pancakes? Who eats those anymore? Any self-respecting pancake must be at least 6 inches minimum (in which case the recipe makes 4 decent "servings") or 7 inch even better (3 "servings").

And while I'm at it, who made up the ridiculous "servings" measurement? I don't believe I've ever seen an accurate definition of a "serving."

tammysf
10-04-2007, 11:43 PM
i love pumpkin curry:http://www.recipezaar.com/108578

pumpkin bars with cream cheese frosting: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Colonial-Pumpkin-Bars/Detail.aspx

ARTraveler
10-05-2007, 05:02 PM
And while I'm at it, who made up the ridiculous "servings" measurement? I don't believe I've ever seen an accurate definition of a "serving."

Next time you're at the grocery store, pick up most any item (okay, fresh produce and meats don't have them!) and check the nutritional data information on the side, back, bottom or somewhere on the package. For instance, cereal. Most serving sizes are anywhere from 1/4 cup to 1-1/4 cups or more. There will be a breakdown of calories, fat, fiber and other nutritional information - vitamins, minerals, etc. Also, there may be a USDA guideline to the amount of calories the "average" person should consume per day. It usually ranges in the 1,800 to 2,000 per person, and if I ate at the low end, I would be as huge as a house.

If the restaurant meals paid attention to this, eating out would be vastly different!

Kairho
10-05-2007, 05:13 PM
Next time you're at the grocery store, pick up most any item (okay, fresh produce and meats don't have them!) and check the nutritional data information on the side, back, bottom or somewhere on the package. For instance, cereal. Most serving sizes are anywhere from 1/4 cup to 1-1/4 cups or more. There will be a breakdown of calories, fat, fiber and other nutritional information - vitamins, minerals, etc. Also, there may be a USDA guideline to the amount of calories the "average" person should consume per day. It usually ranges in the 1,800 to 2,000 per person, and if I ate at the low end, I would be as huge as a house.

If the restaurant meals paid attention to this, eating out would be vastly different!
I do know where the information is. My beef is that what they call a serving size has nothing to do in reality to the amount of the item a person would actually eat.

For example, looking in our pantry I see little bags of instant oatmeal, each about 43 grams. It says that one bag contains 2 servings! Heck, no! A person needs 2 little bags just to stay alive. And then for Wheat Thins a "serving" is 16 little crackers. I challenge anyone to just eat 16 and feel satiated. What sane person would put a quarter of a cup of grated cheese on a dish of pasta? And then I checked the butter: 1 tablespoon is a "serving" which is just about the craziest thing I've ever seen.....

Servings are another ridiculous and misleading government plot.

GREGGWELPE
10-05-2007, 05:47 PM
The Old Horn & Hardart's Automat Pumpkin Pie
This is perhaps the most famous pumpkin pie recipe in the Northeastern part of the US.

2 cups cooked pumpkin (by the way, that's the equivalent of a 15oz can)
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 - 14 1/2 ounce can of evaporated milk (This is from the original recipe and from what I can tell, 12 ounce cans are the only larger size available now. When I made the pie for the first time last year, I tried to use 1 - 12 oz can and I did a second with a full 14.5 oz. I liked the full 14.5 oz better, but then I had quite a bit of evaporated milk left and nothing else for it.)
2 large eggs (Medium eggs will not do, especially if you use the full 14.5 oz of evaporated milk.)
3/4 cup sugar
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 - 11" prepared pastry crust

Preheat oven to 425F.

In a large bowl, beat together all the ingredients (except the crust :rolleyes:) with a power beater or hand whisk until the mixture is smooth. Line an 11 inch pie tin with the pastry. Pour in the filling, and bake in the preheated oven for 40 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center of the pie comes out clean.

Serves 8
Silly question, How do you cook a pumpkin? ^_^

deangreenhoe
10-05-2007, 06:19 PM
Silly question, How do you cook a pumpkin? ^_^

Well, first you have to kill and gut it. Then look for a REALLY big pan and hope it fits in your oven.

Ned
10-05-2007, 06:40 PM
Dean's pretty much right as far as he went, although, I didn't know I had to kill it before cooking it. Dean, is stabbing it ok, or do I have to shoot it? :cool:

Here's what I do to cook a pumpkin, to prepare its "meat" for use in pies:

Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C).
Cut pumpkin into small manageable pieces and cut off pith and seeds.
Place cut pumpkin skin side up in a large roasting pan. Add 1/4 cup of water and bake uncovered for 1 hour or until tender. Remove from oven and allow pumpkin to cool.
When cooled, cut away skin and mash or puree. Use in any recipe that calls for canned pureed pumpkin.You can store fresh, cooked pumpkin in the refrigerator for about five days, or in the freezer for up to six months.

That's about it.

One very important health note:
Never cook a pumpkin that's been carved. The cut flesh is ideal for bacteria growth.

deangreenhoe
10-05-2007, 07:53 PM
Dean's pretty much right as far as he went, although, I didn't know I had to kill it before cooking it. Dean, is stabbing it ok, or do I have to shoot it? :cool:


In your case Ned, just leave it out on the street in Camden overnight. Guido will take care of the first part.

Ned
10-05-2007, 07:57 PM
That will work. ;)

In your case Ned, just leave it out on the street in Camden overnight. Guido will take care of the first part.

tdew
10-06-2007, 08:19 AM
I only did the pumpkin thing once. It was too messy to repeat, but I remembered that I'd read somewhere that you could do it in the microwave. A search brought up this page

http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Baking-with-Fresh-Pumpkin/Detail.aspx

lots of recipes there too.

Maybe I'll try it again??

dshilaos
10-08-2007, 11:23 AM
i love pumpkin curry:http://www.recipezaar.com/108578

Yum, Thanks! I've got to try this one!