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View Full Version : Can someone explain this to me?


stephen_s
09-26-2007, 07:26 AM
http://www.engrish.com/image/engrish/nuts-elsewhere.jpg

Does this mean that the product was made in a nut-free area, but the rest of the factory has nuts?

Ned
09-26-2007, 07:48 AM
It sure sounds that way to me. It's either that, or considering my sometimes very dirty mind they have many men working in the factory with a testicle problem. :rolleyes:

stephen_s
09-26-2007, 07:50 AM
Thanks, Ned, although it doesn't make any sense.

As one with a nut allergy, I have to be careful. I even avoid Chinese food because they usually don't wash woks between dishes.

Ned
09-26-2007, 09:19 AM
I didn't know Chinese restaurants wash their woks at all. I see them doing a quick rinse, but that's it, and that's not going to remove remnants of nuts from the wok, or their stirring implements.

And geez, I thought that someone would jump on my poor joke.

Thanks, Ned, although it doesn't make any sense.

As one with a nut allergy, I have to be careful. I even avoid Chinese food because they usually don't wash woks between dishes.

Loonbeam
09-26-2007, 09:28 AM
The kind of Woks most Chinese restaurants used are designed to need one two washes per day, basically start up and end of day. They operate at such high temps that pouring water in them actually has the effect of boiling off most particles and contaminants.

The take out place near me maintains one 'allergy' wok, where no nut or dairy containing items are used (nothing you can do about gluten in most cases). Ask around and see if any near you do.

Ned
09-26-2007, 09:36 AM
Great advice. Thanks. I have allergies too, so I'm going to ask about this.

The kind of Woks most Chinese restaurants used are designed to need one two washes per day, basically start up and end of day. They operate at such high temps that pouring water in them actually has the effect of boiling off most particles and contaminants.

The take out place near me maintains one 'allergy' wok, where no nut or dairy containing items are used (nothing you can do about gluten in most cases). Ask around and see if any near you do.

Kairho
09-26-2007, 11:08 AM
LIke iron skillets, washing too vigorously will destroy the all-important seasoning of the pan. But the idea of an allergy wok is super (although it won't benefit me personally).

deangreenhoe
09-26-2007, 11:36 AM
LIke iron skillets, washing too vigorously will destroy the all-important seasoning of the pan. But the idea of an allergy wok is super (although it won't benefit me personally).

Soapy water is death to a well seasoned iron skillet. :eek:

It's not good for a nice heavy wok, either. Best to flash the pan with just water and wipe it clean after each use.

jfrenaye
09-26-2007, 11:41 AM
And geez, I thought that someone would jump on my poor joke.

Ned, I will leave the testicle jumping to someone else!

wrp96
09-26-2007, 11:59 AM
Soapy water is death to a well seasoned iron skillet. :eek:


I had a friend that once put her iron skillet in the dishwasher.:eek:

Mine gets a quick rinse and scrub then goes back into a still warm oven for drying (and storage).

the dark knight
09-26-2007, 01:18 PM
That listing makes no sense. It is close to a dirty joke, and a contradiction, while masquarading as a allergy warning (that I do appreciate) at the same time. It is just confusing! Perhaps a more..straightforward listing would be better?
I really do not like nuts anyway(not even peanuts), so I would never order a Chinese dish with nuts in it. The anti-allergy wok is a good idea though, though such would not help me much in that regard.
Sorry, Ned, there is no way I am touching that joke..tempting as it is. (knock on wood) No way am I risking the (highly unlikely) possibility of getting the same "alleged" (equipment) issues of those people working in the factory by trying to make a funny. Sorry.

Bonjour Burnite
09-26-2007, 02:30 PM
Soapy water is death to a well seasoned iron skillet. :eek:

It's not good for a nice heavy wok, either. Best to flash the pan with just water and wipe it clean after each use.

That is before people seemed to be getting all sorts of allergies.

I used to use a well seasoned iron skillet, but my girlfriend’s children have all sorts of food allergies, so I can only cook with it for my kids.

I come from Irish immigrant parents, and no one in my family has any food allergies, I have always wondered that since we did not eat fast foods or even American style foods when I was growing up (neither have my kids) if that has anything to do with these odd modern allergies?

Just a thought

Patrick

Loonbeam
09-26-2007, 02:31 PM
My Wife ruined my cast iron frypan that way.

I had a friend that once put her iron skillet in the dishwasher.:eek:

Mine gets a quick rinse and scrub then goes back into a still warm oven for drying (and storage).

Loonbeam
09-26-2007, 02:37 PM
No one is quite sure what the rash (no-pun intended) of allergies. The current theory in vogue is it has something to do with additives in food that were not present before. Another school of thought is that they are just being diagnosed more.

That is before people seemed to be getting all sorts of allergies.

I used to use a well seasoned iron skillet, but my girlfriend’s children have all sorts of food allergies, so I can only cook with it for my kids.

I come from Irish immigrant parents, and no one in my family has any food allergies, I have always wondered that since we did not eat fast foods or even American style foods when I was growing up (neither have my kids) if that has anything to do with these odd modern allergies?

Just a thought

Patrick

weblet
09-26-2007, 02:42 PM
My Wife ruined my cast iron frypan that way.
Glad to see the wife capitalized...

Maybe I'm way off, but judging by the website this came off of, isn't it meant as a joke? I mean, this website capitalizes on signs in english in non-english-speaking countries....things 'lost in translation'.