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View Full Version : Jalapeno Pie/Quick Stuffed Jalapenos


maryb
05-29-2007, 11:32 AM
What a taste treat! I, in fact, won a prize with this recipe many years ago when I lived in Colorato. It is great alone are as a side for most anything - IF you like spicy.

Split and seed whole pickled jalapenos and line pie pan or quiche pan cut side up(I have also used sliced peppers when in a bind)
Beat 4 large eggs with grated cheese (apprx 1 lb) - use sharp cheddar or a blend of cheddar/mexican.
Pour over peppers and bake at 350 degrees for apprx 25-30 minutes - until set and lightly browned.

Another quick taste treat is to split, seed and rinse whole jalapenos (try to leave stem in tact). Mix drained tuna with just enough mayo to hold together. Fill jalapenos......might want to serve with crackers for the faint of heart.....

wpbagent
05-30-2007, 10:26 AM
To become enchilado or enchilada ( means gets angry, depending on gender)

This and Deano's recipes really mean it but in a different sense.
Another one of recipes from this forum that I am going to try.


In the meantime I will pass this one on to my son also. He loves hot stuff.

Ned
05-30-2007, 03:37 PM
Just for the sake of argument, how hot and spicey is this dish?

deangreenhoe
05-30-2007, 06:00 PM
Just for the sake of argument, how hot and spicey is this dish?

I know that answer to that one. :)

It's as hot as your peppers. Sometimes you never know until you get into them. If you are worried about too much heat I bed you could use roasted poblanos and make sure you remove all of the seeds and white membrane.

I can't wait to give this one a shot.

tiredtravelagent2
06-05-2007, 11:58 PM
Do the size of the jalepaneo's make a difference in the amount of "heat" they put off once de-seeded and de-membraned?

What about the color of them, darker green vs lighter green? Does the color make a difference in how hot they are?

Ned
06-06-2007, 06:11 AM
I was watching America's Test Kitchen on PBS recently and they discussed this very subject.

The Jalapeno Pepper dates back to the time of the Aztecs. In fact, jalapeños take their name from the city of Jalapa, which is in the Mexican area of Veracruz from where they are believed to have originated.

The jalapeño has a heat level that varies from mild to hot depending on cultivation and preparation. The heat, comes from a compound called capsaicin which is found in all chile peppers, is concentrated in the seeds, veins and placenta. The placenta itself is about 16 times hotter than the rest of the pepper. Cutting the placenta off, along with deseeding and deveining will reduce the heat imparted to a recipe that includes jalapeños.

Capsaicin itself is tasteless and odorless and is produced by the glands in the chile pepper’s placenta, found at the top portion of the pepper below the stem. A single drop of this substance combined with 100,000 parts water is still noticeably spicy. They also have a distinct acidic taste. The jalapeño rates between 2,500 and 10,000 Scoville units in heat.

Handling fresh jalapeños may cause mild skin irritation in some individuals. Some handlers choose to wear latex or vinyl gloves while cutting, skinning, or seeding jalapeños. You should be very careful not to touch your eyes until you've thoroughly washed your hands.

The size of the jalapeño doesn't seem to be a predictor of heat, nor the color, as long as it's solid green. On the other hand the dry lines on the pepper indicate heat, however, when buying a jalapeño, it's really impossible to know precisely how much heat it really will have.

Do the size of the jalepaneo's make a difference in the amount of "heat" they put off once de-seeded and de-membraned?

What about the color of them, darker green vs lighter green? Does the color make a difference in how hot they are?

deangreenhoe
06-06-2007, 06:19 AM
Do the size of the jalepaneo's make a difference in the amount of "heat" they put off once de-seeded and de-membraned?

What about the color of them, darker green vs lighter green? Does the color make a difference in how hot they are?

Not necessarily. Generally the larger the variety of chile pepper, the more mild. The smaller the chile, the closer they are to the original wild versions which are extremely hot. As they've been cultivated into larger and thicker skinned varieties, the heat has dissipated.

So a general rule of thumb is the larger and thicker fleshed the chile, the more mild. From personal experience I know that with maturity and size, the jalapeños I grow in the garden seem less hot, but that could be because it's easier to remove the veins and they are getting ready to turn ripe. Also, as they ripen they lose heat. I always let a few of them go red in color in the garden to use for my mild (red) jalapeño jelly. The smaller, bright green specimens are used for the (green) hot!

Oops, cross posted with Ned. I guess it's all about the hot peppers this morning. ;-)

tiredtravelagent2
06-06-2007, 08:55 AM
Thanks guys for the lesson I appreciate it. :)