February 2006

For almost a year, airlines have been rushing to add capacity to their trans-Atlantic routes, especially the one between New York and London. Why? That’s where the money is — at least in the front of the plane. Yet, as capacity increases, corporations have new muscle to demand discounts for volume.

PC tips for your PC

by James Wysong on February 21, 2006

It’s your notebook, workmate, business consultant, mobile office, movie theater and — more often than not — your solitaire buddy. The variety of traveling PCs is mind-boggling: from widescreen to compact to tablet to palm-size. Whichever the variety, your PC is often a hassle when you fly. Here are 10 tips to make your computer a better travel companion.

As airlines have slashed the number of workers to cut costs, they’ve increasingly substituted automated services for jobs humans once did. Travelers are becoming used to the technology, and they’re doing more of the work themselves, including shuffling luggage through bomb detection.

U.S. airlines last year lost about 10,000 bags a day on average, the worst performance since 1990. The rate of lost suitcase reports per 1,000 passengers on flights soared 23% from a year earlier, according to recent numbers from the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Cruise lines would like you to spend more money, so they’re expanding their menus of extras. Step aboard and you’ll be bombarded with choices ranging artwork to wine tastings. There’s some great stuff here, but beware. Are you cruisin’ for a wallet bruisin’? Here’s some advice.

Logan International Airport officials have a stern message for US airlines: Quit being such snow wimps. Last weekend’s blizzard led US carriers to cancel more than 90 percent of Sunday domestic flights in and out of Logan. But all Logan’s international flights that day operated without delays or diversions.

Brent Gaubatz’s big bin gets to Atlanta without a hitch. But on the return flight, AirTran bags Gaubatz with a $65 oversize luggage fee — for the same piece of luggage. Are the agents using different measuring tapes in Atlanta? Or is AirTran selectively enforcing its luggage policies? And will Gaubatz ever see his $65 again?

The biggest players in Las Vegas — the casinos — are perfectly comfortable with the torrid pace of development that has some investors worried, executives say. But demand is likely to keep pace, at least for the next several years, according to industry experts.

Two federal air marshals are facing drug charges after allegedly agreeing to smuggle cocaine from a man who turned out to be a government witness, the U.S. attorney’s office in Houston, Texas, announced Monday.

Oh, baby!

by James Wysong on February 14, 2006

Most of you know that my wife and I have been expecting a baby. She is a pilot and I am a flight attendant, so we figured we would have a smooth, on-time and safe arrival. And we did. Other than that, it was nothing like what I’d imagined.