December 2005

If you like your season full of good cheer, and yearn to be places far from here, we’re sorry to say this might not be your year. Festive feelings could be a challenge to find amid an assortment of bah-humbug holiday travel news: Airline ticket prices have spiked, and planes will be more packed than ever.

It’s his housemate’s birthday, and Ian Rosenfeldt wants to send birthday wishes from his hotel in Costa Rica. Two of his calls don’t go through and one is a wrong number, but his credit card is charged anyway. What’s going on here? Does the phone company really get $43.31 for each call that goes astray?

Air traffic controllers at Logan International Airport spotted sparks coming from underneath a Midwest Airlines jet on takeoff last night, prompting the pilot to return to Boston and make an emergency landing, officials said.

Under threat of legal action, more than 30,000 New York City transit workers went on strike early Tuesday, shutting down the nation’s largest public transportation system just days ahead of Christmas.

It’s that time of year when the airplanes are full, the overhead bins are packed tight with gifts and the weather plays winter-delay games. Airports are overrun with holiday travelers. Emotions run high and patience runs low. Here are 10 tips to get you where you’re going with your holiday cheer intact.

Workers at a pair of private New York bus lines went on strike early Monday — the first steps in what could be the shutdown of the nation’s largest public transportation system.

Travelers! They are so hard to buy for. Trips are too expensive, and they already have lots of great stuff from their travels. And most travelers don’t stick around long enough to ask them point-blank what they’d like. So listen to Charlie. He knows what travelers want.

Subways and buses continued to run this morning as the transit workers’ union and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority took a break from negotiations early today without saying whether they had made significant progress in their effort to avert a transit strike.

Cross-border skiing in Europe

by Jon Surmacz on December 16, 2005

Chamonix.jpgSomething happens when you ski from one country to another: Some indescribable feeling of freedom and lawlessness comes along for the ride. No passports, no customs (not usually, anyway) – just you and the snow and a whole new world at the bottom of the run. Here are six European border resorts for the taking.

New York could be hit on Friday with its first subway and bus strike in more than 25 years, a walkout that could shut down a system used by an estimated 7 million riders a day.